deerplacement_shotreaction

Deer Shot Placement & Reaction

Kris Deer Hunting Leave a Comment

[cs_content][cs_section parallax=”false” style=”margin: 0px;padding: 25px 0px 45px;”][cs_row inner_container=”false” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px;”][cs_text]The video is a collection of clips that shows high neck shot placement when hunting deer. The uploader, also the shooter, was fulfilling a request from a friend to show high-neck shots for educational purposes.[/cs_text][x_line style=”border-top-width: 1px;”][x_video_embed no_container=”false” type=”16:9″][/x_video_embed][cs_text]Reference: RoeStalker on YouTube[/cs_text][x_line style=”border-top-width: 1px;”][cs_text]He further claims that high-neck shots are not for everyone and should be made only from a reasonable distance (not too far or too near). And it is clear why this is so. The deer twitches more than the usual and takes a while to die down.

The video starts with a deer coming out of the protection of the trees into the open field. As it pauses in the clearing, a black bullseye appears on the screen. In the next second the deer is shot exactly where the bullseye was. The video shows several more scenes just like this one, but at different sections of the field.

But what’s really impressive are the times where in some of the scenes, the deer is not even clearly visible but the shooter was still able to accurately get a neck shot. It shows expert skills and mastery of his tool.
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